Becky’s Two Hundred and Seventy-Eighth Book Review: “Gone Tomorrow” by Lee Child

“Gone Tomorrow” by Lee Child starts off once again, with Jack Reacher refusing to behave as a civilian. He sees a woman on a subway car and can’t help but start analyzing the situation. Trouble always finds him, but his inquisitive nature and his need for justice guarantees his involvement whether or not he is wanted. This woman appears to Reacher to be a suicide bomber. And so he runs through the list that he was taught back in the army. “Twenty years later I still know the list. And my eyes still move. Pure habit. From another bunch of guys I learned another mantra: Look, don’t see, listen, don’t hear. The more you engage, the longer you survive.” (Gone Tomorrow, pg 1). And so of course, he engages. He can’t help himself. And that is the beginning of his trouble in the thirteenth Jack Reacher book.

It’s interesting, the way that Jack Reacher sees the world. He spent so much time being told where to go and what to do that now that he is on his own he does whatever he wants. And because of all he has seen, he doesn’t discriminate against bad guys. Or bad people as was the case in “Gone Tomorrow”. The mystery in this book is finding out not only who the bad people are, but what it is that they really want. And what the lengths are that they will go to get it.

Despite loving Reacher as a character, it is hard sometimes to justify what he does. He meddles. He can’t leave things alone. Especially when there is an injustice, even more so when that injustice is against him. It makes you wonder why he hasn’t started a career as a private detective or gone into police work or something. But at the same time, he is a loner. And he likes not having to answer to anyone else. That much is clear. His personality is so blunt, and he stands out so much that to work for someone else – even as a private detective would be stifling. So he does his own thing. He answers only to himself. And listens only to himself. A dangerous combination for anyone that crosses him.

Would I recommend this book? As a Jack Reacher book, of course I would recommend this. Anyone who is already addicted to the series will quickly tear through “Gone Tomorrow”. I wouldn’t however, recommend it to anyone that had not started somewhere else in the series. Most of these books could be read as a stand-alone despite being part of a series. This one might not get a reader hooked as well as some of the earlier books. And there are some aspects of Reacher’s personality that would be difficult to understand if you hadn’t already met him. That being said, I am writing this review while on vacation so that I can go start the next book in the series. So if you haven’t already started the series I strongly recommend that you do – and start at the beginning, it is always the best place to start.

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Becky’s Two Hundred and Seventy-Seventh Book Review: “Sleeping Giants” by Sylvani Neuvel

“Sleeping Giants” by Sylvani Neuvel was such a fun read, a big thank you needs to go out to the guy at work who gave me the perfect book to get into the sci-fi genre – “Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card. Enjoying that book as I did led me to choose “Sleeping Giants” as my book of the month a few times back. The only disappointing part of this book was that it was on the short side and the sequel isn’t due out until April 2017. Cue my sad face. But in the meantime, I am eager to continue my foray into science fiction and convince as many other people as possible to participate in that journey.

“Sleeping Giants” was told not as a narrative, but as a series of discussions much in a Q&A fashion. There is one consistent character, which is never identified, that interrogates all the other characters in this book. I think this was an especially successful way to write this book because it was focused around a monumental discovery. “Sleeping Giants” opens with young Rose sneaking out of the house after her birthday party to take a spin on her new bike. She ends up wiping out and falling into a huge hole. When she is rescued, we learn that she landed in a huge metallic hand. Flash forward seventeen years later where Rose has been recruited to study this one piece in a very large puzzle. The more answers that are found however, the more questions that arise – including if this is a force that should be tampered with. “That also scares me. Am I ready to accept all that may come out of this if it works? It might also have the power to kill millions. Do I want that on my conscience? I wish I knew where this journey will take us, but I don’t. All I know is that this is bigger than me, my self-doubt, or any crisis of conscience. I now truly realize how profoundly insignificant I am compared to all this. Why does that make one feel so much better?” (Sleeping Giants, pg 81)

There were a lot of philosophical questions brought to light in “Sleeping Giants” as you would expect when dealing with scientific discoveries that prove there is something bigger out there in the universe. It was really interesting to see how different characters react to the different developments and obstacles that come up as the story progresses. Although I think the style in which the book was written is intriguing, there are some drawbacks, mainly the fact that you are only privy to the surface level of each character. You don’t get to see into their minds and learn about the characters beyond the dialog that is exchanged.

Would I recommend this book? Yes, I think that there is a wide range of reader that would enjoy “Sleeping Giants”. This is a science fiction novel that is accessible and interesting. I am eager to see where the series goes and cannot wait for the next book to come out.